Thursday, April 3, 2008

General Update

I now have 37,000 words. Hild is ten. She has just deliberately assumed the uncomfortable mantle of lightbringer, per her mother's prophetic dream. She knows she has no otherwordly gifts, but she knows this is the only way to persuade the king to do certain things she--being a very bright and observant child--believes to be necessary. She is very, very lonely.

Naturally, all is about to change: Roman Christianity is about to come to Northumbria, in the persons of Æthelburg, a princess of Kent, and Paulinus, a bishop. Hild, still very much alone, will find herself between a rock and a hard place. But she'll also be exposed for the first time to patristic learning. It should be interesting...

6 comments:

Brandon H. said...

Sounds good so far! It's nice to read an update about how far you've actually come in the writing process. Keep up the posts and thoughts--I'm enjoying following your ideas and process.

nicola said...

Thanks, Brandon. I have to remind myself about this, because when the work is going really well, I forget about the rest of the world.

But I've just finished one distinct arc of the story and am now in thinking mode for the next, so it seemed like a good time...

Jennifer said...

Oh yeah, it's more than interesting. I can't wait!

nicola said...

Thanks, Jennifer.

neile said...

The novel, and Hild herself, sound amazing.

I'm also delighted to know that someone else is interested in reading about British archeology. It's a peculiar pleasure that my partner does not understand. I've subscribed to Current Archaeology for several years, mostly because of an interest in archeology in Scotland.

Would you like me to look to see if any specific geographic areas/places are covered in the issues I have? I'm sure there's a lot of overlap with the magazine you subscribe to, but there might be something else of interest there.

nicola said...

Sure. You never know what might turn up. Thank you. Anything in the north of England, particularly the northeast, or in the south of Scotland. Or, well, anything from the seventh century.